From poets to paper man every one use idioms to describe the situation. Sometimes idioms can be funny if we go through the real meaning. We at times ‘turn a blind eye’ to idioms but do we really!? I don’t think! We keep an eye on idioms. Let us discuss some unusual bizarre idioms around the world.

To let a frog out of your mouth

BIZARRE IDIOMSVIA

Oh no! Did you just eat a frog! No, this is not the meaning of this idiom. It means ‘to say the wrong thing’. Imagine if any one saying this to you when you are eating your favorite pudding or something! How annoying it would be.

To have the mid-day demon

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Don’t think that demon has entered into your room out of a sudden. It means ‘to have a midlife crisis’. You may think everything is going fine in your life. But from nowhere you will be stuck into crisis. Then you use this idiom.

To have a wide face

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You can get a picture of some chines people running in front of your eyes if you ever hear this. But it isn’t that way. To have many friends is referred to as to have a wide face in Japan.

Into the mouth of a wolf

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Don’t get frightened when your superior uses this idiom. It doesn’t mean you are getting into trouble. It means your superior wishing you good luck. He means to get into the work and he wishing you lucks to be your side to achieve your target.

To have a stick in your ear

Ear

No no! I’m not speaking about cleaning your ears with some buds or any kind of related stuff. If anyone anywhere annoys you by their rude language and you will get a suggestion from your friend that ‘not to listen those words’ and be quite to avoid any unnecessary messing up things.

Emit smoke from seven orifices

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Does anyone literally can emit smoke from their ears or from anywhere? No, right! Orifices in this idiom mean eyes, ears, nostrils and mouth. When you are extremely angry on someone or at something you can use this to express that you are angry. If they are good with idioms kind of stuff they will understand you and can keep quite. If they are not good at these they may misunderstand you and this reaction can annoys you more than the previous one.

Have other cats to whip

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Is it! Do you whip the cats to add it to your pudding! I can’t even hear of it! Wait, it isn’t this way. It means ‘to have other fish to fry’, which means you haven’t finished with frying fishes to be served for lunch.

Hanging noodles on someone’s ears

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At an instant, you feel like you don’t want your ears to be hanging with noodles. In Russia hanging noodles on someone’s ears means ‘to fool them’. We in India can hang noodles on someone’s ears on fool’s day easily.

Ride an elephant to catch a grasshopper

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To catch a grasshopper do you need to ride an elephant? Literally it’s not the thing. In Thailand this is most commonly used to let them convey the meaning of ‘putting a lot effort and getting little in return’.

Walk around in hot porridge

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No one dares to walk around a hot porridge and look at you from top to bottom with a weird look if you use this idiom. It is most commonly used in Czech to convey to ‘beat around the bush’. It means to make a great bush with your work.

Though they are hard to learn, these are some examples of bizarre idioms from around the world which makes English a fun language. However, there are even many more such idioms you can find in English language which may annoy you. But these are seriously used around the world not for just fun.